Publications and teaching


PUBLICATIONS (selection)

2016 “Rakenteet ja rajoitukset” (Structures and limitations), article about living as a performance artist in Vienna, Teatteri&tanssi+sirkus 5/2016, pp. 22–23.

2015 “How to address politics of the body in participatory performance? On the possibilities of sensory fields and collective body techniques as analytical tools”. Peer-reviewed research article in Nordic Theatre Studies 27:2: ”Mapping Theatre”, pp. 36-47.
Available via academia.edu.

2014 ”Osallistavan esitystaiteen ideologisia sitoumuksia jäljittämässä” (On the ideological commitments of participatory performance practice), in the Finnish performance art and research magazine esitys 4/2014, p. 34.

2012 ”Reflections on identity politics, ’making together’ and Public Engagement in Lois Weaver’s Tammy WhyNot performances”. In Ikonen, Liisa, Järvinen, Hanna and Loukola, Maiju (eds.): Näyttämö ja tutkimus 4: Esittävien taiteiden metodologiset haasteet. Teatterintutkimuksen seura (Theatre Research Society of Finland): Helsinki 2012, pp. 106–118. Open access e-publication available here.

2007 Kaisa Korhonen and Joonas Lahtinen (eds.) Näytöksen paikka. Suomalaisen teatterin vuosi 2007 (The Place/Site of Performance. Finnish Theatre in 2007). Helsinki: Finnish Theatre Information Centre and LIKE Publishing Company.

2007 ”Catsista Kerjäläisoopperaan – matka musiikkiteatterin huipulle” (From Cats to The Beggar´s Opera – the road to stardom). In Koski, Pirkko and Palander, Misa (eds.): Kansaa teatterissa. Helsingin Kaupunginteatterin historia. Helsinki City Theatre and LIKE Publishing Company. Helsinki 2007. Pp. 271-287.

2007 Jean-Jacques Rousseau: “Kirje herra d´Alembertille” (La Lettre sur les spectacles / Lettre à M. D´Alembert), Finnish translation excerpts from the French original text, co-translated with Rosa Rönkkö. Published in the magazine for art research Synteesi 1/2007, pp. 36–46.

2006 “Brechtin eeppinen teatteri ja eksistentiaalisemiotiikka. Huomioita ja alustavaa analyysiä” (Brecht`s Epic Theatre and Existential Semiotics. Remarks and preliminary analysis). In the magazine for art research Synteesi 1/2006. Pp. 24-37.



TEACHING EXPERIENCE

2016 “Emancipation through participatory art? Politics of the body in contemporary performance and installation”, Theatre Research, University of Helsinki, intensive seminar (5 ECTS) for MA students

In this seminar, we discussed emancipatory possibilities that contemporary art projects in the field of participatory performance and installation aim to offer, as well as the problematic of the subject assumptions, views of the human body and its capabilities, and conceptions about emancipatory action that these projects promote and rely on. This seminar suggests that the most significant ideological standpoints and processes of inclusion and exclusion of participatory art projects that have emancipatory goals cannot be sufficiently located without paying critical attention to the specific modes and strategies of bodily participation that they use.

The aims of this seminar were threefold. First, it encouraged the students to pay critical attention to the bodily and power-related dimensions of any emancipatory agenda and activity – be it about sexual equality, racism or democracy, just to mention a few areas – both in art practices and more generally. Secondly, the seminar aimed to give the students productive tools to define their own approach to viewing, researching and writing about participatory art in a way that takes the bodily dimensions of these endeavours into consideration. Thirdly, the seminar aimed to shed light on the various material-discursive and institutional frameworks within which participatory artists and their audiences operate in today’s cultural climate and which crucially inform the modes of participation employed in specific art projects.

Key questions that the seminar addressed:
*How do “emancipatory” participative art projects address and engage the bodies of the participants?
*What assumptions about art’s efficiency and power to have “positive” effects on the lives of its participants lie behind these material-discursive bodily practices?
*Could certain participatory art practices open up new possibilities to understand or reformulate the idea of emancipatory politics and the subject(s) of emancipation? What risks would these “reformulations” entail?

We close-read and discussed both seminal theoretical texts and less well-known texts that offer insights into the relations between participatory artistic practice, emancipation, body and politics by Claire Bishop, Nicholas Bourriaud, Judith Butler, Ed Cohen, Michel Foucault, Miwon Kwon, Davide Panagia and Jacques Rancière, among others. We also analysed Finnish and international performance and installation projects that deal with: sexual emancipation (e.g. “Tammy WhyNot” by Lois Weaver); emancipatory power of collective social action (e.g. “Complaints Choir” by Tellervo Kalleinen and Oliver Kochta-Kalleinen; “Untitled (Free)” by Rirkrit Tiravanija); emancipation from human-centredness (e.g. “Reindeer Safari” by Toisissa tiloissa/In Other Spaces); emancipation from racism inherent in the nation-state ideology (e.g. “Bitte liebt Österreich” by Christoph Schlingensief and “Österreicher integriert euch!” by God’s Entertainment); and the problem of democratic emancipation (e.g. “dominant powers” by Claudia Bosse/theatercombinat).

Amount of students: 10
Assessment criteria: summaries presented at the class, engagement in the discussion at the class, and an 8-page course essay (A4, font Times New Roman, 1,5 spaced). Each student received individual written feedback about the final essay and her/his participation at the class.


2013 “Katsomisen taide – esityksen havainnoinnin ja esitysanalyysin problematiikasta” (The art of viewing – on the problematic of performance analysis and spectatorship), Theatre Research, University of Helsinki, intensive seminar (5 ECTS) for BA and MA students

This course addressed various assumptions that underlie our acts of “viewing”, “analyzing” and “experiencing” performance. What is it to “view” a performance? What kinds of visual and social histories, power/knowledge-biased and bodily practices of viewing take place in specific performance situations, between the participants? What kinds of assumptions guide the modes of viewing of a theatre researcher, a sponsor, a curator, or an art critic…? What relations are there between the acts of viewing, power relations, and subject assumptions?

Theoretical standpoints discussed at the class: Rudolf Arnheim, Karen Barad, Pierre Bourdieu & Hans Haacke, Michel Foucault, Ernst Gombrich, Donna Haraway, Juha-Pekka Hotinen, Immanuel Kant, Esa Kirkkopelto, Laura Mulvey, Della Pollock, Petri Tervo.
Case studies: “Tammy WhyNot” by Lois Weaver, “Complaints Choir” by Tellervo Kalleinen and Oliver Kochta-Kalleinen, “Reindeer Safari” by Toisissa tiloissa/Other Spaces, “Die keineswegs letzten Piraten” by Lukasund, “Polis 3000: Oratorio” by Markus&Markus.

Amount of students: 21
Assessment criteria: summaries presented at the class, engagement in the discussion at the class, and an 8-page course essay (A4, font Times New Roman, 1,5 spaced). Each student received individual written feedback about the final essay and her/his participation at the class.


2012 “Esitys, yleisön osallistaminen ja politiikka” (Performance, audience participation and politics), Theatre Research, University of Helsinki, intensive seminar (5 ECTS) for BA and MA students

This course addressed the problematic of contemporary participatory art projects; what aims and political and philosophical assumptions as well as institutional and economic biases do specific participatory practices entail? What kinds of “empowering” possibilities underlie these projects? At the classes, we discussed various theoretical standpoints (Claire Bishop, Nicolas Bourriaud, Judith Butler, Jill Dolan, Juha-Pekka Hotinen, Esa Kirkkopelto, Miwon Kwon, Joonas Lahtinen, Jacques Rancière, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Friedrich Schiller, and Petri Tervo) and analyzed recent participatory artworks by Rirkrit Tiravanija, Steinbrener&Dempf, hospital clowns, Toisissa tiloissa/Other Spaces, the “Touring Stage” of the Finnish National Theatre, Tellervo Kalleinen and Oliver Kochta-Kalleinen, and Lois Weaver.

Amount of students: 15
Assessment criteria: summaries presented at the class, engagement in the discussion at the class, and an 8-page course essay (A4, font Times New Roman, 1,5 spaced). Each student received individual written feedback about the final essay and her/his participation at the class.

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